Monthly Archives: February 2010

Freedom of Speech can Co$t You

It’s nice that we enjoy “Freedom of Speech”, but we are still responsible for our speech, and lawsuits are a reality when an individual must protect him/herself from abusive or inflammatory allegations. 

Read a definition of Defamation:

  • Defamation is the issuance of a false statement about another person, which causes that person to suffer harm.
  • Slander involves the making of defamatory statements by a transitory (non-fixed) representation, usually an oral (spoken) representation.
  • Libel involves the making of defamatory statements in a fixed or medium, such as a newspaper or blog post.

So, if you make derogatory statements that result in damage to someone’s reputation or subject them to contempt or ridicule, you could be exposed.

But, what about transparency?

That’s a big buzz word.  That and authenticity.  Yes, we have a right to our opinions and we now can express them to zillions with a couple key strokes.  But, is writing or commenting around one’s character and professional capabilities being transparent & authentic, or is its intent to derail?  

Social media doesn’t eliminate the responsibility we have to mind our words.

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The Impact of the Highly Improbable

It seems it’s in our nature to explain things, even though they are many times unexplainable.  It’s almost as though our minds our minds are machines that must create explanations to make sense of everything.

Blind to the random?

If we see or experience something every day, we believe it to be “the truth” or “the way”.   Take for example the years of a run up on real estate.  It was thought “that’s the way it “is”.  The dangerous thing of being blind to the impact of the random or unexpected is they typically result in debilitating shock.

Other examples include the attacks on the WTC or the farm animal that is nurtured and fed its entire life only to learn one (final) day it’s being raised as food.

All you need is one

Since the random event often yields a devastating aftermath, it becomes clear that the things we don’t know are more important than what we do know.  So, we look to authority figures to provide explanations so we can begin to “solve” and therefore potentially prevent such random occurrences for occurring again.

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